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I have a lot of fruit trees on my little, suburban lot. Papayas come and go, as well as other annual fruits and vegetables, and I love to draw bees and butterflies with flowers and herbs, but when I think of my garden, the first thing I think about is the lemon tree next to my front door that blooms in the spring and hands me hundreds of golden jewels in the dark days of winter. Enjoy new spins on old myths with Raised in isolation by her mother and Maeve on a small island off the coast of a post-apocalyptic Ireland, Orpen’s life has revolved around training to fight a threat she’s never seen.

It’s a postage stamp lot, and packed in as tight as can be are six citrus trees, two pomegranates, two pears, two plums, two peaches, a jujube, three grapevines, a barbados cherry, two olive trees, a loquat, an elderberry, passionfruit vines, blackberries, raspberry… More and more she feels the call of the mainland, and the prospect of finding other survivors. Oh sure, it’s got all the trappings: vivid, eccentric characters; fast-paced, hyperbolic animation; and a robot with a severe case of diarrhea.

They can be acting on instinct or driven by hyper-intelligence.

Whatever the case, they’re perfect because up close, insects can look delightfully alien, with their multitude of legs, assortment of eyes, segmented bodies, and exoskeletons.

One of this week’s featured writers is Anna Smith Spark, the author of the trilogy and the blurb-appointed Queen of Grimdark.

While answering fan questions, she ended up doing a very illuminating deep dive on grimdark as a genre, from its historical roots to its inherent “political dimension” to why she considers it less misogynistic than “heroic” and “sunny” epic fantasy. [Read more] trailer didn’t give us much in the way of actual plot.

Also because In this ongoing series, we ask SF/F authors to describe a specialty in their lives that has nothing (or very little) to do with writing.

Join us as we discover what draws authors to their various hobbies, how they fit into their daily lives, and how and they inform the author’s literary identity. You feel changed, you feel eyes on you, you feel a darkness. This month’s genre-bending releases face the darkness head on.

Historically, there was no other practical use for a sword besides killing a human being. [Read more] As a long-time fan of both speculative fiction and anime, one common thread I’ve noticed in both media is the enduring presence of The School Story.

But that is where danger lies, too, in the form of the flesh-eating menace known as the skrake. Alone, pushing an unconscious Maeve in a wheelbarrow, Orpen decides her last hope is abandoning the safety of the island and journeying across the country to reach the legendary banshees, the rumored all-female fighting force that battles the skrake. But look past the toilet gags, satirical references, and occasional bits of fanservice, and it isn’t hard to discover a darkness that subsumes the series. “This story is my chance to have a little monstrous fun after the weight of the Broken Earth saga, so I’m hoping readers will enjoy it, too,” she told In this bi-weekly series reviewing classic science fiction and fantasy books, Alan Brown looks at the front lines and frontiers of the field; books about soldiers and spacers, scientists and engineers, explorers and adventurers.

And if you have any questions about how far down into the depths a series can descend while maintaining its clownish façade, all you need do is look at Splendid news: N. Stories full of what Shakespeare used to refer to as “alarums and excursions”: battles, chases, clashes, and the stuff of excitement.

But Jackson and Morrison are just the beginning; we would like to invite you into a few other haunted houses built by women writers.

You might see some familiar names here, but if not, you’ll definitely find some new authors to add to your autumn reading pile.

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