Problems with dating coworkers

Rated 3.85/5 based on 937 customer reviews

Hospitality, Financial Services, Transportation and Utilities, Information Technology, and Health Services all topped the list as having higher than average office dating.As a business owner, you might ask: "Where is the legal issue?Essentially, any relationship between two people that could have a negative effect on the company if things sour, or if one party is able to improperly influence the other would fall under the policy.One last generally acceptable rule: If you have a "C" (think CEO, CFO, COO) or VP in your title, you should always think twice about dating anyone in the workplace, even if he or she is not a direct report or within your chain of command.When a workplace romance sours, it can expose the company to increased liability, since the connection between alleged actors is easier to establish--essentially giving the plaintiff some good ammunition for his or her case.Relationships between supervisors and subordinates create even more potential problems.

This can be especially true in high-growth companies that demand long work hours and tend to hire more single employees.

D., an assistant professor at the University of Texas at San Antonio who studies office relationships.

"Nowadays work and life are very integrated." In that light, these stats aren't surprising: 37 percent of people have dated a coworker, according to a 2015 survey by Career Builder, and 30 percent of those relationships ended in marriage (proving that an office romance is not always a disaster).

The legal issue is what I like to call the "amplification" of potential liability that always exists around the employer-employee relationship.

There will foreseeably be claims of favoritism, or even discrimination or harassment.

Leave a Reply